On Second Thought (for Feb. 25, 2013)

On Second Thought is a lighthearted look at current events.

Anxious to show Utahns that gun owners aren’t scary, a bunch of them showed up to a legislative committee hearing this week carrying huge rifles and menacing sneers.
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Hey, if you can’t afford a lobbyist, bring an assault rifle, I always say.
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The good news is Salt Lake City got a lucrative offer last week from a group that wanted to pay $1.35 million to buy naming rights to the Sugar House neighborhood. The bad news is the group was Sugardaddie.com, which sets up dates between rich old men and attractive young women.
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Actually, the offer wasn’t such an honor. The site’s owners already had been rejected by Sugar Land, Texas and have looked at Sugar City, Colo., and Sugar Creek, Mo., as well. Given the dangers of online dating, they might want to approach Truth or Consequences, N.M.
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True fact: Truth or Consequences changed its name from Hot Springs more than 60 years ago just so the game show by that name would come there once a year. Imagine what the city would do for $1.35 million.
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Actually, changing the name back to Hot Springs might be more appropriate for Sugardaddie.com
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The U.S. Postal Service has come up with a new strategy for saving itself from insolvency: sue Lance Armstrong.
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Also, the Postal Service has announced a new line of men’s clothing called, “Rain, heat & snow.” I’m envisioning something that looks like a barrel, symbolic of the service’s finances; or perhaps trousers without pockets.
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Meanwhile, Congress and the president seem content to let those once unthinkable automatic spending cuts take effect next Friday. Republicans and Democrats each hope the other side blinks first. It’s a risky strategy. What if people decide they like a smaller government?
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Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said the automatic spending cuts would cripple the nation’s air traffic system. In other words, it may take your luggage a few extra days to get to the wrong destination.
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The Chinese military made a huge blunder by successfully thwarting security systems and hacking into computers of companies related to the U.S. defense industry. That kind of success means the Chinese soon will have to compete with Silicon Valley recruiters to retain their talent.

 

About the Author

Jay Evensen

Jay Evensen is the Senior Editorial Columnist for the Deseret News. He has 32 years of journalism experience covering politics and a variety of other assignments at news organizations ranging from United Press International in New York City to the Las Vegas Review-Journal and the Deseret News, where he has worked since 1986. During that time, he has won numerous local, regional and national awards. Most recently, he was given the Cameron Duncan Media Award, given annually in Washington, D.C., by the advocacy group RESULTS, to the journalist judged to have done the most to further the cause of the world's poorest people.

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